The Apostrophiser

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Nevermind Batman.

Nevermind Superman.

Here comes The Apostrophiser.

In the news recently was a man from Bristol who is crusading against grammar mistakes, in particular rogue apostrophes, by taking matters into his own hands and making the necessary corrections.

He calls himself a “grammar vigilante” and has gone so far as to create a device called The Apostrophiser (rather like a large Tippex mouse – though not shaped like one, though that would be cool) to remove unnecessary apostrophes.

He remains anonymous and makes these changes without the permission of the shop owners.  Throughout the course of the interview, some shop owners were interviewed; one didn’t notice anything different about his sign and the other did and was appreciative, surprisingly.

Although grammatical mistakes irk me, this guy is going to extremes. The amount of time and money he must have poured into his mission must be astounding. Not to mention the fact that he is not a loner but a family man. I wonder what his family think about his mission or are they in the dark too?  Also, what is it about Bristol that provokes anonymous community service? See also Banksy and his public art.  In fact, the narrator actually refers to him as “the Banksy of punctuation.” Continue reading

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Building Confidence As a… Writer (2) — Live to Write – Write to Live

This is absolutely true.  Writing upon waking is my new habit.  Even if I am writing a load of nonsense, I am still getting into the habit of the act of writing and the act of thinking about writing too.  On the days I don’t do this (usually the weekend) I feel a little lost.

I need to build on my writing time.  Presently I manage a small slot in the morning and some evenings but I need to sneak a little writing into my day time too.  I want to do this.  I know I can do this but if I ever feel doubt creeping in, I will refer back to this post for motivation.

Thank you Lisa Jackson!

 

 

Last week was the first in a series of posts about how to build confidence as a writer. I use the ellipsis to show that the tips can be used in almost any area of life, not just the writing portion. The first post was about starting your day off with something that makes you […]

via Building Confidence As a… Writer (2) — Live to Write – Write to Live

Revisiting old work

Today I read 4 short stories that I haven’t worked on since the end of 2014/January 2015.  I did it peering through my fingers, as one might do when watching a horror movie, expecting absolute carnage.

I was pleasantly surprised.

It wasn’t so bad!

I am now feeling re-energised and excited to resume work on my short story collection along with the novel I am slowly writing.

I’m glad those stories didn’t end up in computer’s recycling bin.

The point of this post is to show that nothing is wasted.  There is merit in all work.

yay

Di 🙂

Ten is the magic number

Ten is the magic number.

Ten minutes of writing upon waking.

Ten minutes of exercise to start the day.

Ten minutes of meditation.

Ten minutes of any large or daunting household task – made smaller by chipping away at it.

Ten minutes of reading before bed.

Ten might be a small number but this small number is helping me be more productive.  It’s helping me form good habits, the kind of habits that will help me get on.  I want to be a writer but I wasn’t writing.  I want to lose weight but I wasn’t exercising.  I want to keep my new house tidy – this will be the hardest one.

It’s a start.  I will build on this but in the meantime, ten minutes of effort goes a long way.

 

Di 🙂

 

When Authors Are Criticised

Authors labour over their work.  Their work becomes a part of them and eventually when they are proud enough of it, they release it into the wild for others to read so I can imagine it stings when someone gives a bad review.  However, surely it’s par for the course?  If you don’t want someone to have an opinion, keep it to yourself.  Opinions, they say, are like assholes – everybody has one.  Note: You may have guessed I have never submitted work for critique this side of high school but I’d like to think I could handle it a little bit better than this screwball:

Teenager gives bad review.  Man feels aggrieved.  Travels over 400 miles to smash a wine bottle over her head while she stacks shelves.  Eek.

It got me thinking about how others react.  There will be some Zen-like people who just let it pass them by, there will be people who are blissfully ignorant of others opinions and then there are others who extract revenge.  The example above is possibly the most extreme example but here are some others:

Richard Ford on his bad review from Alice Hoffman:

Interviewer: Is that a true story that your wife took a pistol and shot a bad review Alice Hoffman gave you?

Ford: Yes, it is a true story. Shot her book. Seemed so good to do. We had another copy so I went out and shot it. I don’t read my reviews anymore.

Stephen Leather argues with Amazon reviewers – see here.  Personally I have never purchased a Stephen Leather book.  He may have some good ones but I downloaded a free book before and it was pretty dire.  I guess that’s the chance you take with a free book though.  His books that were traditionally published and have filtered through a team of professionals are probably more polished and a better read.  Regardless, I think arguing with reviewers is a waste of time.  We all have different taste in books.  You can’t force someone to like your work.

Alice Hoffman argues with a journalist on Twitter and publishes her phone number to encourage fans to call and abuse her.  Wow, seems like she can dish it out but can’t take it.  Remind me to never read an critique an Alice Hoffman book.  See story here.

I’d love to know where you stand on this.  Would you extract revenge for a bad review?  Have you any examples of other cases?  Get in touch!

Di 🙂